Infamous. That might be the best description for Amanita phalloides. The highly toxic mushroom has been feared for centuries, earning it a spot in mystery novels (the mushroom did it) and history books (Roman Emperor Claudius was supposedly poisoned with it). Despite its deadly history, Amanita phalloides remains the cause of 90 per cent of the world’s mushroom-related deaths. This tricky fungus — it can…
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A team of researchers has uncovered a specific gene variant associated with an adverse drug reaction resulting in liver injury in a people with multiple sclerosis (MS). It is the first time researchers have been able to establish a validated genetic marker for a drug-induced harm in people with MS. Published today in the journal Nature Genetics, the findings inform a broader…
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Undergraduates, graduates, and post-doctoral fellows looking to build their knowledge and global perspective in the study of plant-microbe interaction can now do so through a new program called Plant Responses To Eliminate Critical Threats (PRoTECT), hosted by the University of British Columbia’s Michael Smith Laboratories in Canada and the Georg-August-University Göttingen in Germany. Jointly supported by a $1.65 million award (over six years)…
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In Dr. Francis Lynn’s lab, part of the Canucks for Kids Fund Childhood Diabetes Laboratories at BC Children’s Hospital, researchers are going deep inside the inner workings of cells to study how diabetes develops on a molecular level. They’re studying a specific type of insulin-producing cell in the pancreas known as pancreatic beta cells. Diabetes occurs when these cells stop producing…
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Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is safe and efficacious in women without HIV. While good immunogenicity has been observed in women living with HIV (WLWH), efficacy data in this population are needed. We enrolled 420 females aged ≥9 years (range: 9-65) living with HIV. Participants were to receive 3 doses of qHPV vaccine (0/2/6 months). The main endpoint was vaccine failure (i.e.,…
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Nine postdoctoral fellows from the University of British Columbia have received 2018-2019 Banting Postdoctoral Fellowships, out of seventy fellowships awarded nationally. These prestigious fellowships provide each researcher with $70,000 each year for two years, to support research that will positively contribute to Canada’s economic, social, and research-based growth. Tahia Devisscher, one of this year’s Banting recipients says the fellowship will help her advance…
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Students throughout the province are benefiting from a provincial investment of $10 million in internship programs that connect budding researchers with industry partners to solve real-world problems. “Research internship programs are giving our students and researchers the skills, knowledge and experience they need to advance our knowledge-based economy and build the best B.C.,” said Melanie Mark, Minister of Advanced Education,…
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In the clinical practice of anatomical pathology, we are faced with the challenge of making tumour diagnoses with increasing precision, as genomic research into various cancer types has led to the emergence of more and more molecular subtypes, with many requiring a specific pathologic classification to direct a tailored therapeutic approach. Our research has focused on the development of molecular testing to assist in the pathologic diagnosis of tumours, particularly through the detection of fusion oncogenes that characterize many tumour types...
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Eight BC health researchers have been funded in MSFHR’s second Innovation to Commercialization (I2C) competition. Each will receive funding to advance their medical treatments, diagnostic tools and assistive technologies towards practical application to improve health outcomes and enrich the health innovation ecosystem in BC. Now in its second year, the I2C Program is designed to help BC health researchers advance their discoveries or…
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Conditions such as sleep problems, irritable bowel syndrome and depression are more common among multiple sclerosis patients — five years before they develop medically recognized signs of the disease, a new study from the University of British Columbia suggests. Prof. Helen Tremlett at UBC’s division of neurology is the lead author of the largest-ever study to examine the medical records of people…
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