The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) is pleased to announce funding of up to $21.45 million for a total of 13 training initiatives through its Collaborative Research and Training Experience (CREATE) program. These training initiatives will benefit students and postdoctoral fellows by providing them training and mentoring opportunities in a collaborative setting to develop their professional and technical skills,…
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Genomic research is leading to incredible advances in modern-day healthcare but combining health and genomic data can greatly accelerate new discoveries. To enable the advancement of medical research and patient care, Genome British Columbia (Genome BC) has committed an investment of up to $1 million in partnership with Providence Health Care Ventures (Ventures).
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The Field of Cell Competition Comes of Age: Semantics and Technological Synergy

Stem cells experience many selective pressures which shape their cellular populations, potentially pushing them to skew towards dominance of a few break-through clones. An evolutionarily conserved answer to curb these aberrant selective pressures is cell competition, the elimination of a subset of cells by their neighbours in a seemingly homogenous population. Cell competition in mammalian systems is a relatively recent…
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Researchers from Dr. Karen Cheung’s lab are developing an innovative instrument that performs highly precise single cell isolation, to help other scientists with their whole genome sequencing applications. Called Isolatrix, the instrument is a benchtop tool that quickly and accurately provides single cells to scientists in labs, accelerating the pace of their scientific work. “Isolatrix can very precisely partition single…
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Biomedical engineer Carl de Boer is taking a different approach to understanding how the genome works. Most groups study the genome itself, but his group makes variations to create and test the effects of new DNA sequences. “There’s a couple different applications to our work,” says de Boer, assistant professor at the UBC School of Biomedical Engineering. “One of the biggest ones…
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Lifelong production of the many types of mature blood cells from less differentiated progenitors is a hierarchically ordered process that spans multiple cell divisions. The nature and timing of the molecular events required to integrate the environmental signals, transcription factor activity, epigenetic modifications, and changes in gene expression involved are thus complex and still poorly understood. To address this gap,…
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Faculty of medicine professor Dr. Gina Ogilvie is among 15 UBC recipients of new and renewed Canada Research Chairs. Dr. Ogilvie, a professor in the faculty’s School of Population and Public Health, was announced as a renewed Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Global Control of HPV-Related Disease and Cancer. She is also Senior Public Health Scientist at BC Centre for Disease Control…
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Over the past 20 years, scientists have made great strides in understanding the brain and at the same time they know very little about how it works. As neurobiologist Lu Chen says, “We know very little about the brain. We know about connections, but we don’t know how information is processed. Learning, for example, doesn’t just require good memory, it…
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Dr. Cojocaru’s doctoral thesis, “In vitro evolution of a processive clamping RNA polymerase ribozyme with promoter recognition” examines the early evolution of life on Earth through RNA research. Additional to his Origin of Life work, Dr. Cojocaru helped develop a powerful RNA imaging and purification technology, collaborated on research in characterizing human RNA linked to Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma cancer and validated…
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